Archive | December, 2011

Girl Scouts Declares 2012 the Year of the Girl

Girl Scouts Declares 2012 the Year of the Girl

Posted on 31 December 2011 by Press Release

New York, N.Y. — In a move designed to focus national attention on girls and the issues they face, Girl Scouts of the USA (GSUSA) has declared 2012 the Year of the Girl: a celebration of girls, recognition of their leadership potential, and a commitment to creating a coalition of like-minded organizations and individuals in support of balanced leadership in the workplace and in communities across the country.

The announcement comes as GSUSA assumes new leadership under CEO Anna Maria Chávez and prepares to celebrate its centennial in 2012, using this important moment in its history to launch a major initiative to change the landscape for girls and young women. The initiative, which also includes the largest fundraising and advocacy campaign dedicated to girls’ issues in the nation’s history, will be formally announced in January and will extend well beyond the Year of the Girl in 2012.

“The Year of the Girl is only a beginning,” said GSUSA Chief Executive Officer Anna Maria Chávez. “We can’t transform American leadership in a year, but we can transform expectations in a year. We can transform awareness in a year. We can set in motion a generational change, and make certain that a baby girl born in 2012 will experience her life in a new and vastly different world. Only Girl Scouts, with its scale and time-honored place in society, can launch this initiative. If not us, who? If not now, when? When girls succeed, so does society. We know that together, we can get her there.”

This declaration serves as the foundation for Girl Scouts’ broader, multiyear, multipronged effort to break down societal barriers that hinder girls from leading and achieving success in everything from technology and science to business and industry.

During the Year of the Girl, local Girl Scout offices nationwide will mix celebrations of the organization’s 100 years as the premier leadership experience for girls with efforts to create a sense of urgency around girls’ issues.

“Girl Scouts is at the forefront of building girl leaders, GSUSA National President Connie L. Lindsey said. “We embrace the opportunity we have to develop the next generation and future generations of leaders that understand the interconnectedness of the global community. Our girls will understand that they matter. And when they dream their future, they see a world of shared leadership: where the values of courage, confidence, and character really do make the world a better place.”

About Girl Scouts
Founded in 1912, Girl Scouts of the USA is the preeminent leadership development organization for girls with 3.2 million girl and adult members worldwide. Girl Scouts is the leading authority on girls’ healthy development, and builds girls of courage, confidence, and character, who make the world a better place. The organization serves girls from every corner of the United States and its territories. Girl Scouts of the USA also serves American girls and their classmates attending American or international schools overseas in 90 countries. For more information on how to join, volunteer, reconnect, or donate to Girl Scouts, call (800) GSUSA 4 U or visit www.girlscouts.org.

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100-year Anniversary Girl Scout Float

100-year Anniversary Girl Scout Float

Posted on 31 December 2011 by ScoutingNewsStaff

On Monday while you watch the Rose Parade be on the lookout for the Girl Scout’s Float. The Girl Scouts have a float each year in the Rose Parade, but this year the float is a little more special. 2012 marks the Girl Scouts of USA’s 100th Anniversary. Local Girl Scouts helped decorate the float with flower pedals and coconut. The entire float must be covered with natural materials. 14 Girl Scouts from the Girl Scouts of Greater Los Angeles, Girl Scouts of the USA‘s CEO Anna Maria Chávez, and alumni will be riding on the float.

If you would like to dedicate a flower on the float for $5 please visit the Girl Scouts of Greater Los Angeles’ float page.

Source: Girl Scout’s Blog, Moorpark Patch

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Scout Honored by California Fire Department

Posted on 31 December 2011 by ScoutingNewsStaff

SAN RAMON, Calif. – On December 19th, Boy Scout Quentin Boasso, 14, of Danville, CA was presented with a certificate of recognition and fire district cap for his service to a fellow citizen. On September 7th, Quentin and his father were flagged down on their way to Home Depot. They stopped and found a man laying on his garage floor. His SUV had fallen off it’s jack as he was working on it from below. It fell on him and caused a punctured lung, ruptured spleen and six broken ribs. Quentin quickly treated the man for shock by covering him with a tarp and elevating his feet with a box. Quentin kept him calm while his dad talked with the 911 dispatcher. The man has recovered.

Source: Contra Costa Times

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Photo Friday: What’s in a Landscape?

Photo Friday: What’s in a Landscape?

Posted on 30 December 2011 by ScoutingNewsStaff

Photo Friday

We recognize that our audience has an interest in photography to capture special moments such as Courts of Honors, campouts, winter activities, family vacations, sport events, and other gatherings. “Photo Friday” is intended to help photography amateurs improve their photo shoots through photo tips, which may include basic skills, creative shooting techniques, and proper care and maintenance. Tips in this section are written by amateurs, professional photographers, and by other contributors. We hope that you find these tips useful in your Scouting program.

 

What’s in a Landscape?

When we see a scenic photo op, our instinct tells us to snap a few shots with the object in the center quadrant while zoomed. People look at an object and instantaneously conclude that it is unique. Recognizing uniqueness is one thing, but communicating that to someone else in a picture is another. So to better communicate uniqueness to another, simply ask yourself, “What makes the object unique and what can I do to make someone else come to the same conclusion without having to explain it?” Try to utilize surrounding intricacies that turn an ordinary shot into an exciting picture.

Reflections offer a unique look at simple objects.

Tip:Truly open your eyes, look around, and incorporate subtleties into your shot. Try to find picture-enhancing objects such as cloud formations, layers of sediment, colorful flowers, reflection, fence, etc. Shooting an interesting object in the foreground helps to create depth.Including people for scale from a distance amongst wide open background depicts grandeur. Straight, linear objects shot at an anglelead the viewer to the center of interest. Don’t be afraid to offset your main object to one side. Reflections off a body of water produce horizontal symmetry, which is very appealing to the eyes.

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ScoutingNews 2011 Wrap-up

ScoutingNews 2011 Wrap-up

Posted on 29 December 2011 by ScoutingNewsStaff

Thank you for your continued support of ScoutingNews.org! This site is nothing without readers eager for more news on the Scouting movement. 2011 has been a great year, and also a year of changes for ScoutingNews, mainly in the past month. There are two new weekly “columns.” These columns touch on the practical side of Scouting, rather than just news. They are a resource for you.

Words of Wisdom Wednesday is an alliterate twist on the anecdotal “Scoutmaster’s Minute.” Since we all know, sticking to a one minute limit is virtually impossible. Feel free to use these at your unit meetings, while mentoring your Scouts and Venturers, or to send your co-workers into deep thought. Photo Friday gives you tips on capturing your Scouting memories. Hopefully you’ve enjoyed the first few issues of these columns. The next column will debut in late January and there will be a spotlight for Scouts, Scouters, and Units. We’re on the look out for outstanding volunteers, passionate Scouts, or awesome units. If you have ideas for these columns or you’d like to suggest another column, please feel free to shoot an email to contactus -at- scoutingnews.org.

A Few Random Stats

Number of Posts in 2011: 94 (more than once a week isn’t bad right?)

Top Post: North America to host the 2019 World Jamboree This will be one exciting event!

Top 3 Search Engine Results: Scouting News, Geocaching Merit Badge, Lowes Pinewood Derby

Top 5 Countries reading ScoutingNews.org (besides US and Canada): United Kingdom, Germany, Philippines, Mexico, Australia

Like I said before, this site is nothing without YOU. Give feedback, comment, and share. Spread the stories and tell your friends. Follow @ScoutingNews on Twitter. Like the Facebook page “ScoutingNews.” Subscribe to “ScoutingNews” on YouTube. We’re all in this together to spread all the great things happening in Scouting to Scouts and non-Scouts alike. So what does 2012 have in store? “More big changes” says the magic 8 ball. One thing is certain though – continue to expect great news and great resources.

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Words of Wisdom Wednesday: A Lesson from Outside the Classroom

Words of Wisdom Wednesday: A Lesson from Outside the Classroom

Posted on 28 December 2011 by ScoutingNewsStaff

Words of Wisdom Wednesday
The Words of Wisdom Wednesday series is composed of anecdotal segments to inspire and supplement a Scout’s personal development, building core values and moral character. An anecdote on WWW is similar to a “Scoutmaster’s Minute”. These anecdotes are intended to be shared with your units. We will strive to publish updates to Words of Wisdom Wednesday weekly.

 

A LESSON FROM OUTSIDE THE CLASSROOM

An Adaptation of a True Story

One day during my first year in law school, my professor gave us a pop quiz. As a diligent student, I answered the questions with ease, until I read the last one:

“Give the first name of any of the three librarians who re-shelf all the books that students often leave on the desks after each assignment?”

I thought that this could not possibly count toward my grade. I had noticed the librarians whenever I walked into the library. They all were friendly and would ask if I needed help locating a book every time I had an assignment due. I was always very busy and avoided conversations.

Not knowing a single one of their names, I turned in my quiz with the last question unanswered. Right before class ended, a colleague asked the professor whether the last question counts toward our quiz grade.

“No doubt,” the professor remarked. “In your practice, you will meet many people. They are all significant. They deserve your attention and respect, even if all you do is smile and say ‘hello’.”

From then on, I’ve never forgotten that lesson nor their names: Rebecca, Steven, Zarin.

 

Download a pdf of this article.

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Overexposed

Photo Friday: Capturing Snow-Covered Hills vs. Snow-Covered Scouts

Posted on 23 December 2011 by ScoutingNewsStaff

Photo Friday

We recognize that our audience has an interest in photography to capture special moments such as Courts of Honors, campouts, winter activities, family vacations, sport events, and other gatherings. “Photo Friday” is intended to help photography amateurs improve their photo shoots through photo tips, which may include basic skills, creative shooting techniques, and proper care and maintenance. Tips in this section are written by amateurs, professional photographers, and by other contributors. We hope that you find these tips useful in your Scouting program.

 

Over Exposed

Photographing snowy scenes presents some challenges, but nothing you cannot remedy. The problem that people run into is the camera’s false reading of the snow. If you “meter the scene” and snap a picture like you are used to doing, the snow will turn out grey and everything darker than the snow becomes even darker. Just a little bit of picture and practice is all it takes to master this art. As a general rule, figure out what’s going to be your main focus in the picture. Is it the scenic terrain, flora and fauna covered with snow or a portrait of Scouts posing in front of the snow-covered background?

Tip #1: If snow-covered terrain is what you’re aiming for and you are using a digital point-and-shoot, you should try over-exposing by one or two stops (+1 or +2) to let more light into the camera. Doing this will cause your darker objects to brighten up a little. Remember to use the sun as a light source; not as an object in your picture. Play around with the over-exposure feature and use what works best for you. Your camera’s manual will have information on how to access this feature.

Under Exposed

Tip #2:If the latter is your main focus still using your point-and-shoot, then you should first get up close and personal to take a reading of one of their faces (or skin tone) with your camera. Set your camera according to the readings. You can now shoot from any angle.

Tip #3: Under-exposure in this environment creates dramatic silhouettes. Although not commonly used in capturing special memories, this technique is more appealing to Scouts.

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Words of Wisdom Wednesday – It Couldn’t Be Done

Words of Wisdom Wednesday – It Couldn’t Be Done

Posted on 21 December 2011 by ScoutingNewsStaff

Words of Wisdom Wednesday
The Words of Wisdom Wednesday series is composed of anecdotal segments to inspire and supplement a Scout’s personal development, building core values and moral character. An anecdote on WWW is similar to a “Scoutmaster’s Minute”. These anecdotes are intended to be shared with your units. We will strive to publish updates to Words of Wisdom Wednesday weekly.

It Couldn’t Be Done
By: Edgar A. Guest
Somebody said that it couldn’t be done,
But he with a chuckle replied
That maybe it couldn’t, but he would be one
Who wouldn’t say so “till he tried.”
So he buckled right in with the trace of a grin
On his face.
If he worried, he hid it.
He started to sing as he tackled the thing
That couldn’t be done, and he did it.
Somebody scoffed: “Oh, you’ll never do that;
At least no one ever has done it.”
But he took off his coat and took off his hat
And the first thing he knew he’d begun it.
With the lift of his chin and a bit of a grin,
Without any doubting or quiddit,
He started to sing as he tackled the thing
That couldn’t be done, and he did it.
There are thousands to tell you it cannot be done,
There are thousands to prophesy failure;
There are thousands to point out to you, one by one,
The dangers that wait to assail you.
But just buckle right in with a bit of a grin,
Then take off your coat and go to it;
Just start in to sing as you tackle the thing
That cannot be done, and you’ll do it.

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Medal of Merit Recipients

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Medal of Merit Recipients

Posted on 20 December 2011 by ScoutingNewsStaff

Medal of Merit

Medal of Merit, BSA

Scouting offers a lot to youth in today’s world. The lifelong memories of a rainy campout, the experience of leading peers, and skills for every day life. At the base of it all are first aid and CPR. These skills are invaluable and tie directly to the motto of “Be Prepared.” On occasion, a Scout must jump into action and use these invaluable skills to save a life.

The BSA has 5 Lifesaving or Meritorious Action awards: National Certificate of

Merit, Medal of Merit, Heroism Award, Honor Medal, and Honor Medal with Crossed Palms. All of these awards may be given to a youth or an adult. The National Certificate of Merit is given for an act of outstanding service to others. The Medal of Merit is for an act of service which “reflects an uncommon degree of concern for the well-being of others.”

The Heroism Award, Honor Medal, and Honor Medal with Crossed Palms are given for showing heroism and skill in saving, or attempting to save, a life. Each level represents greater risk to one’s self: no risk, considerable risk, and extreme risk.

Honor Medal with Crossed Palms, BSA

In 2010 more than 350 of these type of awards were given. Recently three separate events have been in the news.

Tyler from Troop 331 in Holmdel, NJ was awarded the Heroism award for rescuing two men in a river near the Grand Canyon. Tyler and his family were prepared with ropes and his skills learned in the Lifesaving Merit badge enabled him to use that tool properly during the rescue. Read more at the Holmdel Patch.

Cub Scout Lane Hardin from Peaster, TX helped perform CPR on his Great Grandmother until an ambulance could arrive. Lane’s keen knowledge of CPR helped him show his Grandmother the proper compression-breath counts. Story at the Weatherford Democrat.

 

In Missoula, MT two adults, Tony Higuera and Jay Skovlin, performed CPR on a heart attack victim at a Cub Day Camp. Having the proper leadership and emergency plan are key to a great event. Event leader David V. Grey and on-site nurse  Erin Ward Barney will be awarded a Council level award. Details on the Montana Council website.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Softshells: An Essential Source of Warmth and Comfort

Softshells: An Essential Source of Warmth and Comfort

Posted on 17 December 2011 by ScoutingNewsStaff

Softshell jackets should be essential to your winter cupboard. They offer the best of both worlds combining warmth and flexibility in the midst of chilling winds. Unlike most other types of jackets, a good quality softshell jacket is water-resistant, windproof, breathable, and elastic to keep you doing what you enjoy. Great for hiking, skiing, or just a stroll around town, you can wear them comfortably and fashionably almost anywhere you go. Lined with fleece, they are made to keep the warmth in and the cold out. Seasoned skiers wear softshell jackets under their regular ski jackets for extra warmth during below-freezing temperatures. Softshells can be the best substitute to the heavier and bulkier ski jackets for better mobility with enough weather protection to keep the elements out.
Recommendations include the Apex Bionic Jacket (available for Men’s and Women’s) by The North Face and the Men’s Sawyer’s Creek Softshell or Women’s Key Three Softshell by Columbia.

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ScoutingNews is an independent publication and is not affilated with the Boy Scouts of America, Girl Scouts of the USA, or World Organization of the Scout Movement.