June – July 2009 National Jamboree Bulletin

The June – July 2009 National Jamboree Bulletin is on the BSA Jamboree Website.

A few of the highlights:

Lower prices from BSA Supply—There are lower prices on some items in the 2010 Jamboree package plans. The new prices are located on www.MyBSA.org (Internal Scouting Profesionals Website). Council professionals responsible for jamboree will have access to the new prices.

Jamboree patches—All council contingents that have paid the first $100 per person have received or should soon receive their adult leader and youth Scout patches. These are being sent directly to councils to the attention of the council jamboree contact.

Come to the jamboree—There is still room for participants to attend the 2010 National Scout Jamboree. Check with your local council for details. Regions still have troop allocations that have not been fulfilled.

Second jamboree payment—The second payment of $400 per person is due to the National Council on or before July 31, 2009. Participant and adult leaders make payments directly to their council; staff must make their payment online. Late fees of $50 per person ($2,000 per troop) will be applied to those who do not make the payment on time. Don’t forget! Pay by July 31.

Council contingent coordinators—Councils with three or more contingent troops must appoint a council contingent coordinator. This person must submit an adult leader application. Once the council has approved the adult leader application, send that person’s name and contact information to 2010jamboree@scouting.org.

Troop numbers—Jamboree troop numbers are being assigned to councils by Boy Scouts of America regions. Councils have been instructed how to assign Scouts and leaders to troops and submit the troop number assignments, as well as the leadership assignments, to the Jamboree Department.

Approve leaders—If councils have not done so, now is the time to approve youth and adult leaders through the jamboree registration system.

Gateways—Jamborees are full of color and excitement, something in which troop gateways have always played a big part. Showing Scouts from other parts of the country what’s unique or interesting about a troop’s home area is a time-honored jamboree tradition. Troops usually design their gateways to reflect the most notable aspects of their home area—history, geography, industry, etc. This is often done in very creative and novel ways.

It’s important to plan ahead when designing and building the troop gateway. To ensure that all materials, tools, and equipment will be available, it is vital that plans be made early to transport everything that’s needed with the council contingent. The jamboree site is relatively remote. Once there, obtaining the simplest of tools or materials could be a real headache. Due to the lack of facilities or personnel to receive them, shipping separate materials or equipment to the jamboree is not an option. Everything must be transported with the council contingent. Troop gateways must not exceed 10 feet in height and must be of non-conductive material.

No holes—Federal authorities have prohibited the digging of holes of any kind, for any purpose, anywhere on the jamboree site. Applications for permits to dig holes for gateways will not be considered. This rule will be strictly enforced. All gateways must be designed with supports on the ground surface and must be secured by weights, staked guy lines, or other means not requiring holes in the ground. Storms are common at jamborees, and gateways should be designed to accommodate winds of up to 70 miles per hour. It is highly recommended that troops design, fabricate, erect, and test gateways prior to transporting them to the jamboree site.

Troop gateways—The height of troop gateways will be limited to a maximum of 10 feet and can have no electrical components. The 10-foot height restriction includes flagpoles, which must be of nonconductive material (wood, PVC, etc). There will be NO climbing allowed in the erection of the unit gateways. No tents or other unit components will be allowed within the “fall zone,” the height of the gateway itself.

Metal poles for troop tents are permissible; however, no troop tents may exceed 10 feet in height.
Subcamp and regional gateways may not exceed 16 feet in height (including attached flagpoles or other amenities) and 20 feet in width, which is the existing design of the jamboree-installed wooden gateway structures. These are to be decorated per the site plans. Each subcamp and region must develop a detailed erection and demolition plan for decorating the provided gateway. No climbing on the gateway will be allowed, and no modifications to the structure are allowed.

Visitors—From Wednesday, July 28, through Tuesday, August 3, the jamboree will be open to visitors from 9 A.M. to 5 P.M., with the following exceptions:
– Wednesday, July 28: 11 A.M. to 5 P.M.
– Saturday, July 31: 9 A.M. to 11 P.M. (to allow for arena show attendance only)

There are no accommodations on site for visitors, including RV, tentage, or fixed housing. Upon entering the jamboree site, guests will be directed to the visitors information tent in the main parking lot, where they will receive directions to regions, subcamps, or activity areas. Visiting Scouts will not be able to participate in action center and/or program activities.

Still have questions about jamboree? Check the jamboree Web site, www.bsajamboree.org

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Comments

[…] June – July 2009 National Jamboree Bulletin […]

Very nice information. Thanks for this.

By Camping Sites on August 1st, 2009 at 8:30 am
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