Tag Archive | "Inventing Merit Badge"

Preliminary Requirements for Inventing Merit Badge

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Preliminary Requirements for Inventing Merit Badge

Posted on 06 June 2010 by admin

The preliminary requirements for Inventing Merit Badge are starting to float around to various Councils.  The Inventing Merit Badge is set to debut sometime in 2010.  These requirements should not be used to start the Inventing Merit Badge but rather to provide an idea of what the merit badge will entail, prior to its release, to drum up support and excitement. 

Proposed Inventing Merit Badge Requirements 

1. In your own words, define inventing. Then do the following:
     A. Explain to your merit badge councilor the role of inventors and their inventions in the economic development of the United States. 

     B. List three inventions and how they have helped humankind. 

2. Do ONE of the following:
     A. Identify and interview with a buddy (and with your parent’s permission and merit badge counselor’s approval) an individual in your community who has invented a useful item. Report what you learned to your counselor. 

     B. Read about three inventors. Select the one you find most interesting and tell your counselor what you learned. 

3. Do EACH of the following:
     A. Define the term intellectual property. Explain which government agency oversees the protection of intellectual property, the types of intellectual property that can be protected, how such property is protected, and why protection is necessary.

     B. Explain the components of a patent and the different types of patents available.

     C. Examine your Scouting gear and find a patent number on a camp item you have used. With your parent’s permission, use the Internet to find out more about that patent. Compare the finished item with the claims and drawings in the patent. Report what you learned to your counselor.

     D. Explain the term patent infringement.

4. Discuss with your counselor the types of inventions that are appropriate to share with others without protecting and explain why. Tell your counselor about one nonpatented or noncopyrighted invention and its impact on society.

 5. Choose a commercially available product that you have used on an overnight camping trip with your troop. Make recommendations for improving the product, make a sketch that shows your recommendations, and discuss your recommendations with your counselor. 

6. Think of an item you would like to invent that would solve a problem for your family, troop, chartered organization, community, or a special-interest group. Then do EACH of the following, while keeping a notebook to record your progress: 

     A. Talk to potential users of your invention and determine their needs. Then, based on what you have learned, write a proposal about the invention and how it would help solve a problem.  This proposal should include a detailed sketch of the invention. 

     B. Create a model of the item using clay, cardboard, or any other readily available material. List the materials necessary to build a prototype of the item. 

     C. Share the idea and model with your counselor and potential users of your invention. Record their feedback in your notebook. 

7. Build a working prototype of the item you invented for requirement 6*, then test and evaluate the invention. Among the aspects to consider in your evaluation are cost, usefulness, marketability, appearance, and function. Describe how your initial vision and expectations for your idea and the final product are similar or dissimilar. Have your counselor evaluate and critique your prototype.

*Before you begin building the prototype, you must share your design and building plans with your counselor and have your counselor’s approval.  [[The health and safety aspects can be discussed in a note to the counselor and in the text.]] 

8. Do ONE of the following:
     A. Participate in an invention, science, engineering, or robotics club or team that builds a useful item. Share your experience with your counselor.

     B. Visit a museum or exhibit dedicated to an inventor or invention, and create a presentation of your visit to share with a group such as your troop or patrol.

9. Discuss with your counselor the diverse skills, education, training, and experience it takes to be an inventor. Discuss how you can prepare yourself to be creative and inventive to solve problems at home, in school, and in your community. Discuss three career fields that might utilize the skills of an inventor.

Remember these are not the final requirements, and Scouts can not start working on the new Inventing Merit Badge until the merit badge pamphlet is released by National.

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Scouting’s Centennial is Out of This World—Literally!

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Scouting’s Centennial is Out of This World—Literally!

Posted on 05 April 2010 by admin

The Boy Scouts of America (BSA) has officially taken its 100th Anniversary Celebration to new heights. Four Year of Celebration patches left the stratosphere today as cargo on the space shuttle Discovery’s STS-131 mission to the International Space Station. A Year of Celebration, A Century of Making a Difference is the BSA’s 100th Anniversary patch-earning program that allows participants to earn recognition for making a difference in their communities.

“This collaboration between the BSA and NASA underscores a long history between Scouting and space programs,” said BSA Chief Scout Executive Bob Mazzuca. “At the earliest opportunities in Scouting, we are exposing young people to space exploration and preparing them for future work in science and technology fields.”

The relationship between Scouting and space stretches to before man’s first steps on the moon. In May 1964, 29 of America’s 30 astronauts visited Philmont Scout Ranch, the BSA’s high-adventure base in Cimarron, New Mexico, for a two-week training trip to learn geological mapping and seismographic studies in preparation for the Apollo programs. Of the 12 astronauts who have walked on the moon, 11 were Boy Scouts. More than half of all U.S. astronauts have been involved in Scouting, including well-known astronauts Neil Armstrong and Jim Lovell, who are Eagle Scouts.

In 2010, the BSA will introduce three new technology-driven merit badges, including Robotics. During STS-131, mission specialist Dorothy Metcalf-Lindenburger will use the robotic shuttle arm to inspect the space shuttle for any damage that may have occurred during launch or while in space. Other members of the STS-131 crew will use the space station’s robotic system, Canadarm2, to move equipment from the shuttle’s payload bay to the station.

Though firmly rooted in an unchanged set of core values, the BSA is committed to remaining current and relevant by adapting how it delivers programs and reaches its audiences. The BSA’s three new merit badges—Robotics, Inventing, and Geocaching—are indicative of how it is adjusting to prepare young people to become leaders and participating citizens in an increasingly technological world. Today, Scouts can read the Boy Scout Handbook on an iPhone, use GPS devices in addition to a map and compass, and receive BSA news via social media channels such as Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube.

Any Scout, leader, or Scouting alumnus, can earn five special award ribbons that hang from the Year of Celebration patch. Reflective of a century of Scouting values, the ribbons honor dedication to leadership, character, community service, achievement, and the outdoors.

After the patches return from space, they will be displayed as part of the 100th Anniversary exhibit at the National Scouting Museum in Irving, Texas. Eight major national 100th Anniversary engagement programs have been designed to reintroduce Scouting to the next generation of young leaders and reconnect millions of alumni with the organization. Flying high on the space shuttle isn’t the only high-speed recognition of the BSA’s 100th Anniversary. Earlier this year, the BSA announced its Scout-themed IndyCar collaboration with Dale Coyne Racing. Just last week, Union Pacific unveiled UP No. 2010 Boy Scouts of America, only the 14th commemorative locomotive in the company’s history .

About the Boy Scouts of America
The Boy Scouts of America is the nation’s foremost youth program of character development and values-based leadership training. The Scouting organization is composed of 2.7 million youth members between the ages of 7 and 20, 1.1 million volunteers, and nearly 300 local councils throughout the United States and its territories. For more information on the Boy Scouts of America, please visit www.scouting.org.

More information about 100 Years of Scouting can be found at www.scouting.org/100years, www.twitter.com/boyscouts, and www.facebook.com/boyscoutsofamerica.

Source: BSA Press Release

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